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WHAT'S INSIDE CENTRUM?

Find out what micronutrients are in Centrum and how they affect you.

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  • What is Beta-carotene?

    Fill your plate with colored fruits and vegetables! Beta-carotene is one of a group of red, orange, and yellow pigments called carotenoids. Beta-carotene converts to become Vitamin A in the body. There is no DV (DailyValue) for beta-carotene or other pro-vitamin A carotenoids. However, according to the National Academy of Sciences, eating five or more servings of fruit and vegetables combined each day, including some dark green and leafy vegetables and deep yellow or orange fruits, is seen as sufficient for providing the suggested amount of beta-carotene and other carotenoids.

    Why do I need it?

    According to the IOM (Institute of Medicine), consuming three to six milligrams (3,000 to 6,000 micrograms) of beta-carotene daily (equivalent to 833 IU to 1,667 of IU vitamin A) maintains blood levels of beta-carotene in the range that supports general eye health.*

    Where do I get it?

    Carrots, Sweet potatoes, Winter squash, Dark Leafy Green Vegetables.

    Which Centrum has it?

  • What is Biotin?

    Biotin is a vital component of enzymes that allow you to use energy from fats and carbohydrates. It also supports the health of your skin, nervous system, metabolism and cells.*

    Why do I need it?

    Biotin is required for the function of an enzyme involved in fat production. As part of every cell membrane, fat helps separate the inner workings of cells from their environment. It is especially critical for cells that must be rapidly replaced, such as skin cells.*

    Where do I get it?

    Biotin is widely distributed in foods. However, data on the actual biotin content of foods is limited and varies significantly. To ensure you get the biotin you need, eat a well - balanced diet with a variety of foods. Biotin deficiency is rare.

    Which Centrum has it?

     

  • What is Calcium?

    According to the USDA’s 2015 dietary guidelines for Americans, Calcium is one of the four major nutrients adults and children consistently do not get enough of. Your body can store calcium, but it can’t produce it. That’s why you must get the calcium you need from foods, beverages, and dietary supplements.

    Consuming adequate calcium throughout life may reduce the risk of osteoporosis. 

    Calcium absorption is highest during periods of intense growth, such as childhood and pregnancy, as rapidly growing bones spur the high demand for the mineral. With the exception of pregnancy, calcium absorption starts decreasing during adulthood and continues to decrease with age.

    The first few years after menopause begins mark rapid calcium loss from bones in women. Estrogen production decreases, which causes more bone breakdown and decreased calcium absorption from foods and dietary supplements. The RDA for calcium consumption increases for women at age 51, the time menopause typically starts.*

    Why do I need it?

    Your body needs calcium to build and maintain strong bones.* If your body lacks sufficient calcium over many years, you could face health problems related to weaker bones:

    •   Children may not reach their full potential adult height.

    •   Adults may have more bone fractures. 

    •  The risk of osteoporosis increases.

    Where do I get it?

    Dairy products, such as cheese, milk and yogurt.

    Dark green leafy vegetables, such as broccoli and kale.

    Fish with soft bones that you can eat, such as sardines and canned salmon.

    Which Centrum has it?

  • What is Chloride?

    Chloride is found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. It is an important part of the salt found in many foods and used in cooking. Chloride is found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables.

    Chloride, together with potassium, is also found in most foods and is usually the main ingredient of salt substitutes.

    Most Americans probably consume more chloride than needed, in the form of table salt and salt in prepared foods.

    Why do I need it?

    Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids. It is an essential part of digestive (stomach) juices.

    Where do I get it?

    Seaweed, Rye, Tomatoes, Lettuce, Celery.

    Which Centrum has it?

  • What is Chromium?

    Nutrition experts know that chromium is an essential nutrient, but they are not exactly sure of all the ways it works to support health.

    One thing is certain: Chromium supports the action of insulin, a hormone required for storing and metabolizing carbohydrates, fats, and protein. It also assists several enzymes that initiate reactions involved with energy production.*

    Most Americans probably consume more chloride than needed, in the form of table salt and salt in prepared foods.

    Where do I get it?

    Chromium is widely distributed in the food supply in small amounts. To ensure you get adequate chromium in your diet, aim to eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of foods.

    Which Centrum has it?

  • What is Copper?

    It may be considered a “trace” mineral, but copper’s role in supporting good health is formidable. In relation to other nutrients, your body only needs a small amount of copper—but that little dose accomplishes quite a bit.

    Why do I need it?

    Copper is required for the proper function of enzymes involved in energy production at the cellular level, and the formation of the connective tissue that helps support the heart, blood vessels, and bones.*

    Where do I get it?

    Mussels, Oysters, Lobster, Shiitake Mushrooms.

    Which Centrum has it?

  • What is Folic Acid?

    Folic acid is the synthetic counterpart to folate, a B-vitamin that can be found naturally in certain plant foods. Of the two, folic acid is the most readily available – the body absorbs about twice as much folic acid – but they play the same role in good health.

    Cell reproduction is among folate’s most important duties. Folate is necessary for making the nucleic acids DNA and RNA and, as such, folate helps to produce and maintain all new cells, a process that is critical during times of rapid growth, such as pregnancy and infancy. This also explains why folate/folic acid is so important in maintaining normal brain function.

    When you’re expecting a baby, adequate folic acid helps to prevent certain birth defects, and is necessary during the remainder of the pregnancy, too. The USDA’s 2015 dietary guidelines for Americans identifies folic acid as a nutrient needed for women in their childbearing years who are capable of becoming pregnant.

    Whether you’re pregnant or not, folate helps to produce healthy red blood cells capable of transporting oxygen to each and every cell.*

    Why do I need it?

    Cell reproduction is among folate’s most important duties. Folate is necessary for making the nucleic acids DNA and RNA and, as such, folate helps to produce and maintain all new cells, a process that is critical during times of rapid growth, such as pregnancy and infancy.*

    Where do I get it?

    Sources of Folate include Asparagus, Lentils, Broccoli, Artichoke Hearts and Spinach.

    Which Centrum has it?